Printing Various Size Photos to 8x10/Fill letter size AUTOMATICALLY?

mikling

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dpi, ppi, pixels per inch. Prepare to be mesmerized and confused. Here sits an Epson workforce with potential dpi greater than fine thousands etc. guarantees I will not be able so see the grain. Right?
Wrong. Printer mfrs are only telling half truths in their specs. It's the print that matters. Either it is a real photoprinter or it is one that claims it can print "photos". I am also a driver but not a race car driver. I can maybe get off the line in a race car and it ends there but not a race car driver. For some just getting around the track will qualify them as a race car driver. So be careful with reading specs......sometimes the truth is stretched.

Dpi specs etc are tooo simplistic to take seriously anymore. except for the actual resolution in an image. Even so, full frame digital photos differ from crop sensor photos in their image quality despite having the same image resolution. I don't know exactly why but sometimes I want a full frame but not need one. Very similar things happening inside the printer engine as well. Hidden secrets.
 

Ink stained Fingers

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I'm getting lost here - this thread started off with a pretty simple question ' Printing Various Size Photos to 8x10/Fill letter size AUTOMATICALLY?'
 

stratman

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IMO, the industry has unnecessarily used PPI and DPI interchangeably, which can be confusing.

PPI is (usually) Pixels Per Inch and relates to the digital image in its electronic format, ie what you see on the computer monitor or the image file itself. PPI denotes the resolution of an image, eg 640x480.

DPI is Dots Per Inch and, for our purposes in this discussion, relates to how many dots of ink a printer sprays onto the paper per inch. The printer's DPI is used to represent on paper the PPI of the digital image.

To further clarify, or maybe muddy the waters more, what Ink Stained and The Hat may be talking about.... http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/mythdpi.html
 

stratman

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I'm getting lost here - this thread started off with a pretty simple question ' Printing Various Size Photos to 8x10/Fill letter size AUTOMATICALLY?'


You are correct. However, another poster brought up tangentially related issues which we are trying to answer. While this topic deserves its own thread, sometimes we wing it as long as the OP, or actual thread popo (The Hat), is OK with it.
 

oroblec

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You are correct. However, another poster brought up tangentially related issues which we are trying to answer. While this topic deserves its own thread, sometimes we wing it as long as the OP, or actual thread popo (The Hat), is OK with it.
i'm with you, sometimes some answer brings new question so we gonna open a new tread for all of them at the end we are talking of photo printing. stratman i read all of that stuff now i'm more confused at the end dpi and ppi is the same just try to see the dimension of the image.
 

The Hat

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Everybody assume that everyone else knows the difference between DPI and PPI. !

Well their assumptions can be very wrong and varied, but as most are not exactly sure, the subject tends to get glazed over by introducing even more technical issues thrown in to mask their own discrepancy’s.

PPI is indeed Pixels Per Inch, which is specific to Digital imagery and equipment, and most tend to get that bit right, and it should never be confused with DPI, but what about DPI ?

Again here nearly everybody gets this wrong, and with a commanding voice they’ll say, “You meant PPI don’t you.” (This subject has been cover already in some detail.)

But DPI was used mainly for Image Reproduction in the Printing and newspaper trade back when Adam was still a boy, it’s still used in scanning and RIP Laser printers, but never in Inkjet printers. (Using a Loupe on a laser printed sheet to see these pesky little dots clearly), 300 DPI can’t not be seen clearly by the human eye and so was used as a Standard.

Lastly we come to LPI, so what the hell is that used for, ask and you are guaranteed to be told wrongly, it now stands for “Lumosity-Performance-Index”, because (Wikipedia) says so, but it meant something very different to the Printing industry.

Back then it was used to convert halftone screens to a pattern of dots for every known publication, the term LPI, was in fact Lines Per Inch for a given image and was used for perfect reproduction, and DPI was measured as 1 ½ times LPI.

Newsprint used 65 LPI, Standard leaflets used 85 LPI, Brochures used 100 LPI and magazines used 133 LPI, because each publication used different paper surfaces, and to hold a good open dot in an image each publication used a different LPI screen.

it’s still much the same on the average Inkjet printer today, use too porous a paper surface or too high a print setting and the dots will merge to eliminate the white area around them giving a much poorer print to what was originally intended, it’s now known as bleaching.

So ends the Rant...
Now back to Printing Various Size Photos to 8x10 ! !
 

stratman

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So ends the Rant...
Now back to Printing Various Size Photos to 8x10 ! !
You said a mouthful, Thread PoPo! It's a deep rabbit hole we dipped our toes into.

Now we wait for the OP to return so we may continue with his original post.
 

PeterBJ

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The solution to the OP's problem is actually simple. This is from my laptop running Win 10 but not the Anniversary edition (yet?). Windows 10 can handle the printing and fit the images to the paper format without problems. Just right-click your image and select print. This will open this window, which is well known from older Windows versions:

Print photo-2 W10.jpg


This is in Danish, but the windows are the same for all languages only the language is different. In the drop down menus "Papirstørrelse" means paper format, "Kvalitet" means Quality and"Papirtype" means paper type/type of media. The checked "Tilpas billede til ramme" near the bottom means fit image to paper format. The blue "indstillinger" means settings, and clicking it opens the printer driver. All your photos will fit the paper, if fit to paper format is checked. The image will be cropped if the aspect ratio is not the same for image and photo paper.

Unchecking "fit to paper format" will avoid cropping, but you might then get wide white borders on top and bottom or sides of the image on the paper instead.

This is in short, do you want a more detailed tutorial @vienna01 ?
 
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stratman

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@PeterBJ

Windows 10 Anniversary Update has three different photo apps baked into the OS -- Paint, Photos, and Windows Photo Viewer. Each offers more or fewer options than the other for printing.

You seem to be using the format also used in Windows Photo Viewer and is what I looked at initially before trying the printing software that came with my printer (which does what the OP wants). One thing I noticed with this method was that the Fit Picture To Frame does not remain unchecked after closing the app and then reopening.

Using the software that came with my printer - Canon Easy-PhotoPrint EX - I can save my settings. You can also easily select more than one image to print at those same settings.

Since the Windows Photo Viewer GUI you posted about also allows you to select more than one image, albeit you must select all individual files BEFORE clicking on "Print" from the right click menu, it might take fewer clicks to get what the OP wants.
 
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