Dye ink fade test; OCP vs IS vs IR vs fotorite

jtoolman

Printer Master
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
May 7, 2011
Messages
1,948
Reaction score
939
Points
277
Location
United States
Printer Model
All of them! LOL
To me, borderless prints equate to cheap 4x6 or similar giveaway glossies one gets from the local one hour photo service. I do them as well on my Artisan 720 and I do not place too much value on them.
Serious printing utilizes fine papers and I always "Border" them with a fairly wide border where I write in my "John Hancock " and other pertinent info so there is no doubt who it to "blame" for the product.

So my many 13 and larger printers never ever print borderless. I know there will be many who will disagree but ask yourself if you have ever seen a fine signed print done otherwise.
OK I've seen a few that were signed right on top of the actual image! GASP!!!!! I would not pay a cent for that!

Joe
 

costadinos

Printer Guru
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
273
Reaction score
98
Points
111
Location
Cyprus
Printer Model
7900, 4900, 9890, R2000, P50
martin0reg said:
- The claria seems much better than any other dye ink.
Is this only the case on epson paper? How much worse is the fading with claria on cheaper paper, especially sihl?
Unfortunately I didn't have enough OEM claria ink left in the cartridges to print on more types of paper, but I would guess it would perform better than the third party dye inks on cheap paper, but not as good as the OEM ink on good paper.


martin0reg said:
-You have tested dye ink from third party. Is the pigment ink epson OEM?
Do you have any experience with pigment ink from third party, especially IS and OCP?
For the test above I used a combination of OCP and IS pigment inks (Black and Magenta from IS, the rest from OCP)
Third party pigment ink is significantly more fade resistant than Epson OEM Claria.
I do have two prints, one made with IS/OCP pigment ink and the other with Epson Ultrachrome HDR ink, sitting in direct sunlight for over 6 months, and I still haven't noticed any signs of fading from either one.
 

Fenrir Enterprises

Print Addict
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
372
Reaction score
14
Points
153
Artists sign original paintings right on the artwork all the time. While the border is useful for not cutting anything off while matting and framing, I think it comes down to personal preference as to where to put the signature. Sometimes I see it on the border, sometimes on the artwork, and lately I've often seen it on the back, instead.

Silver/metallic ink seems to be the go-to to differentiate authentic signed prints vs copies.
 
M

manitoidman

Guest
The density and saturation seem better with the OCP ink's!
 

costadinos

Printer Guru
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
273
Reaction score
98
Points
111
Location
Cyprus
Printer Model
7900, 4900, 9890, R2000, P50
Lucas28 said:
Colors are substantially better on dye ink prints. I did a home test, it can be found here:
If you compare the output of a 4-color pigment printer to that of a dye printer, like you did, then yes, the dyes will be clearly superior.
Try comparing a print made with an 8-color printer (R2000, R2880 etc) to any of the current dye printers, the pigment wins hands down.
I've compared a print made with 3rd party pigments in an R2000 to that from a 1400 with OEM dye inks, the R2000 print is clearly superior in saturation, especially in the reds/yellows (the extra red and orange inks do make a difference).


Lucas28 said:
Photos won't fade as long as you keep them in a box or an album.:)
Wouldn't bet on that. Try looking at any wedding album over 20 years old, most of the photos will have probably faded to oblivion by now.
Even those made on Crystal Archive, for which Fuji claims 70 years fade resistance. And keep in mind they also claim that their digital labs (using dye inks made by Epson, probably very similar to Claria), match their Crystal Archive in fade resistance...
 

sbrads

Getting Fingers Dirty
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
27
Reaction score
5
Points
29
Location
U.K.
Printer Model
iP4700
There was a photo lab print test in a UK magazine a year or so back which included a 3 month window fade test with half the photo covered up to make any changes really obvious. The results for all the dozen or so lab prints were atrocious, all of them faded and colour shifted badly, but they had a control print from an Epson 360 on Epson paper and that hardly faded at all!
 

Crumpet

Printing Apprentice
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
11
Location
UK
Printer Model
Canon Pixma Pro-100
What a great test Costadinos, thanks mate. The good quality papers do a much better job as you said & these tests are very extreme showing how well the pigments inks hold up. I think people get too hung up on the longevity of prints especially if the prints are for our own walls. I have dye ink prints hanging up for many years behind glass with no fading at all & quite a few get changed out for newer better prints. I have no interest in prints lasting 100 years & even if I sold a print will the purchaser feel cheated if it shows signs of fading in 20 years time, at least the print outlasted their curtains.
Yes, I totally agree with you. I've had dye prints hanging up in various rooms in my house for 20 years or more and they still look good.
 

The Hat

Printer VIP
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
14,921
Reaction score
8,147
Points
433
Location
Residing in Wicklow Ireland
Printer Model
Canon/3D, CR-10, CR-10S, KP-3
Ah yes BUT, if you care to reprint the same photos out again then all will be revealed, the difference will be like chalk and cheese.

The photos hanging on walls over the years always look great because like our memories, our eyes adjust and can’t see the differences over time, but they are there none the less.

Anyway it’s a great excuse to see just how well our newer printers perform with these same photos, AGAIN..:weee
 

Latest posts

Top