So Tempting - Bambu Lab X1 3D Printer

Nifty

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@Nifty Just want to say that if you are seriously considering that printer it would be worth having the patience to watch the first video as there are a few things you may wnat to consider before pulling the trigger ;)
While tempting, a few things held me back:
  1. I'd wait for the 2nd iteration / version (maybe a bit after the kickstarter has completed / shipped) for the software to be fully fleshed-out and bugs squished.
  2. While it does a lot of cool automated stuff... there are some things I like to do manually. I still don't have an auto-bed leveling system... and I'm ok with that. Maybe my mind would be changed once I start using one successfully. I'm guessing if that were to happen, it would be on a printer like this.
  3. Replacement parts: I love how cheap and accessible replacement parts are for my printers.
  4. I do enjoy tinkering with my Creality printers, and love that there are SO MANY printable modifications out there for both of my models. Maybe someday I'll tire of tinkering and just want a nice printer that I don't have to even think about.
So ya... the Bambu is tempting, but right now it's just not the right fit for me.

That said, I'm SUPER excited about their design and features and REALLY hope that this pushes all the other manufacturers to get off their butts and start really innovating faster to bring even more features while driving down prices.
 

Redbrickman

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Another review


I liek that my Voron does auto bed levelling and nozzle scrubblng/priming before any print starts. Its a bit like when automatic transmisison cars came out, people said they were a gimmick, now very few Americans drive a manual shift. Its not essential but very handy :)
 

The Hat

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I liek that my Voron does auto bed levelling and nozzle scrubblng
I’m the old fashioned type, and I reckon auto bed levelling is just another gimmick, my KP3 came with auto levelling, so I was anxious to give it a try, well I wasn’t wrong it is a Feckin gimmick, I’ve never used since.. A piece of 100 gm paper under the nozzle does it far better..
 

Redbrickman

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I don't think the KP3 has auto bed leveling unless you add the 3DTouch probe. What you are describing is probably an automatic positioning of the nozzle on the corners of the bed so you can adjust the level? The newer CR10's have something similar I believe.

The next step up is being able to adjust the bed as above and also do a bed mesh probe which then is saved in the EEprom. When printing the machine then adjusts the height of the nozzle at any point on the bed to try and keep the layers the same height and compensate for any high or low points on the bed.

The there is true autobed leveling where the printer adjusts the bed or the gantry at each corner and does a bed mesh to make sure that at any given point the nozzle is the same distance from the bed.

Having said all of that on a small print bed such as the KP3 if the plate is flat then simple adjustment of the corners is sufficient to get a good even layer.
 

Artur5

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Sorry The Hat, but here I disagree with you. No gimmick at all. Auto bed levelling is a must if you want a perfectly flat and smooth first layer with no ridges or bumps between contiguous lines of filament. This is specially noticeable on prints with a large contact area on the bed.
My printer does a 7X7 bed mesh before starting to print and there're additonal settings for minor corrections at the front, rear, left and right sides. Even 1/100 mm. makes a difference. No manual adjustment can do that.
I'm talking about flexible steel plates with PEI layer. I imagine that glass beds are more evenly flat and accurate that steel sheets, so maybe in that case a good manual levelling would be acceptable (just.. ;))
 

The Hat

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Sorry The Hat, but here I disagree with you. No gimmick at all. Auto bed levelling is a must
Good, then that makes you a happy camper.. not everyone is as mad as me..:)
I don't think the KP3 has auto bed leveling
Yes I know what I was using on the KP3 was not all singing and dancing bed levelling, and I didn’t buy it for that either.. I simply don’t trust the auto leveller..

When I start a print I use my fingers to check the very first lines lay down and if necessary adjust the bed accordingly, it’s easy to feel whether or not the filament lair is the correct thickness or if it has good adhesion to the bed or not..

The bed will always have a height difference depending on the temperature used with each print, so I opted for the same temp on every print, which reduces the risk of the print lifting on any one edge, on maximum size prints, I have to use clamps to hold the mat firmly down to stop it from lifting..

P.S. having a static hot bed would be more useful than any bed leveller..:cool:
 

Redbrickman

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Having a flat bed is more useful than anything else as there is then minimal work to do to get a good consistent print, however more often than not the cheap aluminium beds are nowhere near flat. My CR10 is like a bow and needed "shimmimg" with foil in the centre to get it anywhere near flat with a build plate on top. Even adding a glass sheet on it before trying shimming resulted in the glass conforming to the bow of the bed.

Cast aluminium build plates are much better as they can handle heating and cooling with minimal long term effect, however if you are wanting something even more flat then a bed mesh is the way to go.
My Voron plate varies by 0.02mm across the 300mm width which is good enough for my printing needs but others use a bed mesh to improve over that small deviation.

In the end you need to work out how obsessed you are with dimensional perfection and decide what is acceptable to you. It's a hobby, either you enjoy it or it stresses you out and you do something else instead :)
 
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