Observations of CLI-42, 220/221 and 225/226 carts

SkedAddled

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Speaking of OEM carts only here.

All are similar in size with the exception of PGBK. Does not apply to CLI-42.

42, 221 and 226 carts seem identical in size, but probably have a few minor
differences. All of them actually slot into both a PRO-100 and a MG5320,
but it's not advisable to do so.

ALL of these carts are identical in their construction:
Chemical- or heat-bonded bodies to top shell,
prism on bottom for the "true" ink monitoring,
the same locking tabs, same placement for chips, etc.

The differences:

CLI-42 are straight-up:
Clear tanks, easy to flush and refill. Ink levels easy to visually see.

225/226 are one-use at best.
Opaque body, no chance of visual ink level confirmation.
Must be extremely difficult to accurately refill.

220/221 are the ones to use for 225/226 replacements,
with a chip transfer. There's a window for viewing ink level,
making the process much simpler.



With ALL of the above carts, I have found some consistencies
within these cartridges:

1) The top label is most certainly NOT an applied adhesive decal;
it is a heat- or chemical-bonded fixture of the cartridge.
While it seems to be a typical label, it cannot be simply peeled off.
No edges of the label lift off with normal methods.

2) ALL of these carts use the very same method of fill,
with the sealing ball beneath the label.
Rather than an Xacto knife, I recommend a fairly sharp
penknife or pocketknife to cut the label, but not one that is
as sharp as can be. It'll leave a much cleaner fill hole
if you're careful and steady enough to cut within the opening,
and leave a much cleaner look to your carts, if you even care
about such trivial things.

3) Once the label is cut to provide access to the sealing bead/ball,
use a pin or pushpin or other fine-point tool to make a start
for whatever screw or tool you use, but ROTATE IT within the
ball to create a socket for your screw tool to begin threading
into the sealing bead. Do this rotation AFTER it's removed
from the sealing ball, so the ball isn't rotated into a position
you can't get a pullout tool into.

4) These can be difficult to open, so a fine, thin screw with
an appropriate extractor will be required.
I used a safety pin, pushed into the ball with a tiny screwdriver,
to get more leverage.
The pin was forced well into the sealing bead, then I pulled it out.
I then put the pin back into the hole gently, rotated it to increase
the diameter of the hole, then carefully threaded a tiny screw
into it. When the screw seemed seated well, I used a dentists'
angled tweezer to pry the ball out of the hole.
Use whatever tools you have on hand, but DO NOT damage
the fill hole.
 

PeterBJ

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...1) The top label is most certainly NOT an applied adhesive decal; it is a heat- or chemical-bonded fixture of the cartridge. While it seems to be a typical label, it cannot be simply peeled off. No edges of the label lift off with normal methods...
It is most likely thermally bonded to the cartridge body using an ultrasonic welding process.
 

The Hat

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42, 221 and 226 carts seem identical in size, but probably have a few minor
differences. All of them actually slot into both a PRO-100 and a MG5320,
but it's not advisable to do so.
I don’t know why most remove the OEM refill ball to refill their cartridges, in fact it’s a Feckin nuisance and at times extremely difficult because not all of these balls come out of the carts easily.

And after removing the ball then what, you must use a drill to enlarge the OEM refill hole, so it will accept a plug to seal the hole properly after refilling, Wow all that seems ridiculous.

What not cut out the middle man and make life so much easier by drilling the hole back from where the OEM refill ball is situated, it makes the whole procedure that much easier, or the need to interfere with the label, I stopped using that method years ago.

To solve the opaque body problem in a iP4700, I used CLl-8’s in place of the smaller 221/226 carts, the printer did need some body work removed with a Dremel tool, but the printer was perfectly happy with the new arrangements after just one refill, and no more small Opaque carts..
 

SkedAddled

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I don’t know why most remove the OEM refill ball to refill their cartridges, in fact it’s a Feckin nuisance and at times extremely difficult because not all of these balls come out of the carts easily.
True, but doing so preserves physical integrity.
It's also the only method for refilling I've seen which is described clearly and concisely,
with even a few cautions against blithely drilling into another part of the carts.
I'd rather follow tested-and-true known methods than pave my own road which could lead
to an abrupt dead-end or catastrophe.

And after removing the ball then what, you must use a drill to enlarge the OEM refill hole, so it will accept a plug to seal the hole properly after refilling, Wow all that seems ridiculous.
Well, I like to be precise and fastidious. ;)
It's my nature.

Besides, not all plugs are created equal.
No need for drilling if the plugs fit securely.
 
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