iP4200 BK disappeared

The Hat

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I am printing on Plain Paper setting, so it definitely is PGBK that's acting up.
I hate to say it… But it’s time for a new printer, your trusty old 4200 is at the end of the line… Sorry.. :(
 

stratman

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I hate to say it
And I hate to say it that fearless Moderator @The Hat may be right. :mad:

Might as well try a Deep Clean cycle for the PGBK cartridge only. Power off the printer and let sit overnight. Power on the printer the next day, run a Regular Cleaning cycle, print a nozzle check, if normal then print a single test page of text on Plain Paper setting.

Is there ANY improvement (or worsening) of missing ink?

Scan, crop and post both the nozzle check and test page of text.
 

PeterBJ

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The missing pigment black could be caused by a clogged cartridge, clogged nozzles, clogged ink passages in the print head, a defective main board or a defective print head.

As the PGI-5 PGBK cartridge is new, it should not be the cause of the missing pigment black. I think you did not forget to remove the vent sealing tape?

This leaves print head clogging or an electronic defect as the cause of the missing pigment black. A stamp test can determine if ink is present at the pigment black nozzles: Do a nozzle cleaning from the driver and then open the lid and remove the cartridges and the print head. Press the underside of the print head against a soft tissue paper napkin or pocket handkerchief to get a stamp. Here is a post with all inks present, the long stripe is pigment black. Here is a post with pigment black missing and here is one with a cleaning procedure for the pigment black nozzles.

If the pigment black is missing from your print head then cleaning the print head might bring it back. If pigment ink is present then it means that the print head and/or the main board in the printer is defective. As I think these parts are nowhere to be found, sadly I think it means you will have to buy a new printer.
 

turbguy

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I would try a good soak of the printhead. I would even gently pressure flush the PGBK paths. If the nozzle check is OK (and it seems it is), and a known good cart is used, there must be starvation of flow to the PGBK nozzles somewhere. That could be in the internal passageways between the screened inlet and the nozzle plate. PGBK solids in those passages can be quite stubborn to loosen and free up, particularly with some aftermarket inks.
 
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elenhil

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If the pigment black is missing from your print head then cleaning the print head might bring it back. If pigment ink is present then it means that the print head and/or the main board in the printer is defective. As I think these parts are nowhere to be found, sadly I think it means you will have to buy a new printer.
Well, mine is looking exactly like the first one: no PGBK stripe at all.

The thing is, I soaked the bloody head this Tuesday (as per stratman's instruction). Following which it stopped printing PGBK altogether (instead of producing the funnel-shaped missing patches described above).

And I did remove the tape, sure.
 
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elenhil

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And sorry guys if I seem to have confused you. The previous nozzle check image referred to what it looked like prior to soaking (when the funnel-shaped loss of ink occurred - stratman said he found it surprising that the could be loss of ink followed by a normal-looking nozzle check).

After soaking for 24 hours with Fairy it looks like this: no PGBK at all, even with a new cartridge. And - amazingly - it had been looking like this a year ago until suddenly PGBK was back (and now it's not!
 

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elenhil

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The real question is: I have just acquired another second-hand iP4200, and its head is currently soaking away. Perhaps I may be able to restore it to life. PeterBJ's stamp test seems to suggest it's not the logic board that's at fault. Should I try inserting the 'new' head into my original printer? The whole matter of 'dead heads causing logic board damage' is somewhat mysterious to me.
 

PeterBJ

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Did the stamp test show no pigment black like in "B" in the image?

Stamptest 1.jpg


If so then cleaning might bring the pigment ink back, If the stamp test looks like "A" and no pigment black is printed, then there is an electronic fault in the main/logic board and/or the print head. Only a new print head might then bring the printer back to working order.

But when a Canon print head fails electronically it might damage the main/logic board. A logic board damaged in this way might damage a new print head. So replacing a damaged print head is a gamble, and swapping print heads between printers for troubleshooting is risky.

How does the nozzle check and possibly a stamp test for the "new" iP 4200 look?

Sometimes an electronic fault in a Canon print head can begin as an intermittent fault and later become permanent. This could be the reason for the strange reset procedures to revive a print head sometimes seen on YouTube and on the web.

When cleaning a print head with water or other cleaning fluid, it is very important that the print head is completely dry before installing. Else moisture can create a short circuit or leakage current that can ruin the electronics in the print head and logic board. See this post.
 

elenhil

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Did the stamp test show no pigment black like in "B" in the image?

View attachment 10865

If so then cleaning might bring the pigment ink back,
Yes, it's just like B.

Do you believe soaking might not have cleaned my original head (and somehow even made it worse)?

Also, this Regular/Deep Cleaning business gets me nervous. I almost thought I burnt the nozzles the last time because, as I was talk later, doing too many of them (especially without ink coming out to cool them) will fry the little guys.

How does the nozzle check and possibly a stamp test for the "new" iP 4200 look?
Will tell you once I'm finished thoroughly soaking - and drying - it.
 

PeterBJ

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If cleaning the print head didn't bring back the pigment black in the nozzle check and in a new stamp test then more print head cleaning is needed.

How did the new iP4200 print before starting cleaning the print head?

I guess most Canon users on this forum think that deep cleaning is to be avoided, especially more cleanings in short intervals due to stressing the print head.
 
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