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How Print Neutral Black & White With Cmyk-based Epson Printer

Discussion in 'Epson InkJet Printers' started by pharmacist, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. Jul 16, 2017 at 2:54 PM
    martin0reg

    martin0reg Printer Master

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    Like pharmacist already said, you have to experiment. MK is often warm tone, while PK is mostly on the magenta or violet side. And further more these tints differ on different paper (which don't appear to be different white... until it is printed).
    That's why I would not do this with a ciss printer. Because ink switching with another K, for example a K which you have tinted by adding a color ink, is not as easy as with refillable cartridges.
    I told that in dpreview forum just one week ago, where somebody ??? had the same idea...
    https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4177754#forum-post-59796927
     
    The Hat, stratman and pharmacist like this.
  2. Jul 16, 2017 at 4:12 PM
    mikling

    mikling Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    That is the reason why Epson K3 printers and now the newer Canon Pro models are so much better at B&W. Tonality shifts with media and it also shifts at each density as well.
    The fact that you can adjust the tonality from within the driver pretty much makes the printing with an all K inkset obsolete. If you were to do it properly, you need to adjust not ONE but nearly all K with tints.
    This is automatically taken care of for you in a K3 machine and Canon Pro provided the LC and LM and the LK , LLK and Y is closely balanced against the OEM.
    When all the futzing around is taken into account, IMO it is better to focus on the images and tonal composition that futzing around with the balanced tinting. Just get a K3 printer starting at the R2880 and newer, the 2400 will also suffice but requires more attention to printing regularly, and get the talent required in the B&W image......and it requires a LOT to make a masterpiece. Suffice to say, also get the NIK Silver Efex Pro....that is a gift from Google....free.
    So if you're thinking about honing your skills in B&W, move up to these K3 and Canon Pro printers and spend the time on the image and not the print...despite this being a printing site. ...kind of heresy but that is the way it is.

    BTW the Canon Pro machines I refer do not include the 9000 and 9500. In this generation Canon eventually saw the major advantages inherent in a K3 type driver and the next Pro generation followed with it ( Pro-1, Pro-10, Pro-1000 etc.. The introduction of the Pro-1 using 4 Ks IMO made piezography obsolete. Why? resolution and control is right up there because remember that the real resolution you get converting a color engine to B&W is a lot less than you were made to believe by the piezography creators because the amount of overlap in the densities is huge and thus redundant. Hard to explain but some will get the idea.
     
    Ink stained Fingers likes this.

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