EPSON Ecotank printer, INK, official Driver on windows behavior

ClarenceL

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I have a pack of the CR672A - 20 sheets on order, I'll check if that's the same paper as the CR674A
https://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-wiki.en/index.php?title=Special:Search&search=oba&go=Go
Might be a reference to search new OBA low/free target paper.(But the data was around 2014 or older)

I would check the EPSON Premium Glossy photo paper here first, I might still have some EPSON Premium semi-gloss photo paper.
The HP Advanced photo paper Glossy is much easier to seem here, since it's selling as HP cartridge bundle in Costco.
 

Ink stained Fingers

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I was not specifically looking for papers with a low OBA content, I was profiling the HP paper, and the spectral display of the white point in the i1Profiler software was just showing a much lower UV response than other papers.
There are a range of FineArt/specialty papers on the market which claim museum/archival properties , but they are just too expensive, that's niche products whereas I'm expecting that HP papers like the CR672A would be available worldwide.
 

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I compared the CR674A and CR672A HP papers - they both have a very low (or zero) OBA contents, here are the spectral displays of the white paper

Here the CR674A paper

CR674A.jpg


and the CR672A paper

CR672A.jpg


They are as close as they can be, a brief explanation for the M0, M1, M2 measurement conditions can be found here

https://www.xrite.com/-/media/xrite...ctor_what_does_it_mean/l7-510_m_factor_en.pdf

M0 and M1 are with UV light and M2 without UV light illumination - the green line in the diagrams.

And here is the spectrum of the Canon PT101 paper

PT101.jpg


The differences are obvious - the red and magenta lines - M0 and M1 - jump far above the level of 1 - up to 1.25 which indicates a strong conversion of UV light to a blue visible light by the optical brighteners.

I have tested and profiled quite a lot of papers and can say that this Canon paper comes with the most OBA's and the HP papers CR674/672A have the smallest amount of them, all other papers are somewhere in between. (I'm not talking about some FineArt or other types of specialty papers - Baryta - Cotton Rag etc , some come as well with OBA's and other papers don't but that's expensive niche papers I'm not dealing with very much).

I compared as well the gamuts of these papers at L=50 and L=20 , the green line is for the CR672A paper, this one has a slightly smaller gamut across the luminance range , not much but measurable so these 2 papers to not have exactly the same coating but will overall deliver the same look of prints

CR672-4 L50.jpg CR672-4L20.jpg


Here is a comparison between the CR672A and the Canon PT101 with the blue line, the Canon paper overall exhibits a wider gamut, specifically at lower luminance levels, this overall gives better detail definition in darker image areas (if your image has such details in the first place)


CR672-PT101 L50.jpgCR672-PT101 L20.jpg
 

ClarenceL

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I compared the CR674A and CR672A HP papers - they both have a very low (or zero) OBA contents, here are the spectral displays of the white paper

Here the CR674A paper

View attachment 14394

and the CR672A paper

View attachment 14395

They are as close as they can be, a brief explanation for the M0, M1, M2 measurement conditions can be found here

https://www.xrite.com/-/media/xrite...ctor_what_does_it_mean/l7-510_m_factor_en.pdf

M0 and M1 are with UV light and M2 without UV light illumination - the green line in the diagrams.

And here is the spectrum of the Canon PT101 paper

View attachment 14396

The differences are obvious - the red and magenta lines - M0 and M1 - jump far above the level of 1 - up to 1.25 which indicates a strong conversion of UV light to a blue visible light by the optical brighteners.

I have tested and profiled quite a lot of papers and can say that this Canon paper comes with the most OBA's and the HP papers CR674/672A have the smallest amount of them, all other papers are somewhere in between. (I'm not talking about some FineArt or other types of specialty papers - Baryta - Cotton Rag etc , some come as well with OBA's and other papers don't but that's expensive niche papers I'm not dealing with very much).

I compared as well the gamuts of these papers at L=50 and L=20 , the green line is for the CR672A paper, this one has a slightly smaller gamut across the luminance range , not much but measurable so these 2 papers to not have exactly the same coating but will overall deliver the same look of prints

View attachment 14397 View attachment 14398


Here is a comparison between the CR672A and the Canon PT101 with the blue line, the Canon paper overall exhibits a wider gamut, specifically at lower luminance levels, this overall gives better detail definition in darker image areas (if your image has such details in the first place)


View attachment 14400View attachment 14399
I have i1pro M0, could I identify the low OBA also based on the M0 reflexion?
Canon PT-101
canon_PT-101.png

Canon LU-101
canon_LU-101.png

EPSON Inkjet paper 105gsm
epson720_ijp.png
 

Ink stained Fingers

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You see in my diagrams the M2 curve - the reflection without OBA activation runs at about 95 to 97 % for most papers , a paper is not a mirror so you don't ever get 100% , and every reflection increase above 100% is caused by an OBA in the M0 curve, and your diagram of the PT101 paper matches exactly the level in my diagram , the M0 curve is typically slightly lower than the M1 curve but that doesn't matter for this OBA evaluation. You can test different papers, and you can measure the reflection curve before and after a fading test - and you'll see that OBA's fade as well.
 

ClarenceL

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Print by XP2101 + T00V(T522) complete CMYK inks + EPSON Premium Semigloss 251gsm photo paper (4x6) SKU s041874
Compare between different drivers & media.
On matte paper media , the drivers designed for pigment black ink or DuraBrite Ultra always smaller gamut & lighter colors.
On EPSON Premium SemiGloss media (Besides L365 utilize K, others only CMY)
Worth to notice the ET-2800 improved K on Glossy but made browner greyscale.

I don't understand why even pigment K only driver also lighter on color inks when we select the matte paper.
So I always have some concern about using the driver designed for pigment ink on refill dye inks.

EPSON_PremiumSemigloss251g.png
EPSON_PremiumSemigloss251g_scan.jpg


Also check on Epson Photo Quality Inkjet paper 105gsm (Presentation Matte)
Still lighter color on pigment based drivers.
EPSON720img20220703_17502538.jpg
 
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Ink stained Fingers

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Canon was and is delivering a pretty wide printer model range with 5 inks - with a dye black and a pigment black. Epson is shipping only a few printers configured with 2 black inks - like the ET7700 or ET8500 - and some cartridge type models, most printers come with 4 inks - CMY dye or pigment - and black dye or pigment. Most of these printers with 4 colors don't print with black if a glossy paper is selected even if the printer runs with a dye black - like some Ecotank models. Utilizing the black ink channel for printing via the matte paper selection is a work around to overcome this limitation, the real black ink - dye or pigment - delivers a better, more neutral black than the mix of CMY on glossy papers, and I just accept the gamut I get with this mode of operation since it is a work around. Other Epson photo oriented printers like the L805 or L1800 don't have this problem, and they just use a dye black ink.

I don't understand why even pigment K only driver also lighter on color inks when we select the matte paper.

This is an effect before profiling, and should be gone with a matching profile for a reprint of these patches.

Durabrite pigment inks are not targeted for photo print, even less on glossy papers, so you just have to use what you get, or you start refilling with Ultrachrome (compatible) inks via refill. And applying an overprint with a gloss optimizer increases the gamut - visibly and measureably - I tested all that but that is a different subject altogether.
 
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