do we need to use weak solvent-based cleaning fluid when cleaning the print head of pro10?

The Hat

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he most important question is still: Is the lucia pro ink used in pro10 only water-based pigment ink.
Yes, all water based inks, and Canon don’t make oil based printers for the desktop market..
Your also right about legal implications of this material..
 

stratman

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Does it mean that lucia pro ink is oil-based ink?
The following is from a brief reading of literature today. Someone else more knowledgeable than I will hopefully post.

Ink may have several functional components:
  • Colorant - Dye or Pigment particles
  • Carrier - Liquid that carries the colorant
  • Binder -Fixes the colorant to the media
  • Additives - promote or create various effects (see here)
The MSDS for a Lucia PGI-72 does not list an "oil" as the carrier. The carrier appears to be water.

https://canon.a.bigcontent.io/v1/static/SDS6404B_EUEN(200930)

Pigment inks use a resin (coating on the pigment particles?) to act as a binder of the pigment particle to the paper. Resins may be Alkyd in nature and derived from a process using oil, no oil, and various amounts of oil.

Typical inkjet printers used in the home use Aqueous- or water-based inks whether they use Dye or Pigment as colorants. Water is the carrier of the colorant. Oil-based inks may be used in printers, including certain inkjets, designed for printing on various media but are usually not standard usage for home printers, for example offset printers and printing on vinyl, glass, textiles.

However, confusing the issue is the following statement from 123ink about "What Is Printer Ink Made Of?"

Most printer ink is made of what is a base of linseed or soybean oil, or a heavy petroleum distillate used as the solvent. This is then combined with pigments to create ink that is designed to dry by evaporation. This base is often referred to as varnish.

Several years ago the forum briefly discussed this issue:

https://www.printerknowledge.com/th...r-based-ink-simple-tests-to-distinguist.8159/

FYI - In the ink manufacturing community a "solvent" is something other than water used as the liquid carrier of the dye/pigment colorant, such as an oil or oil-based liquid. Chemically, though, water is considered a solvent. Also, there appears to be inkjet printers that use oil-based inks such as the Epson T7000. However, this is not your typical home printer.
 

jbhtjbht

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Thank you very much for the technical documentation! The harder removal of lucia pro ink is probably related to the use of more resin materials.
The following is from a brief reading of literature today. Someone else more knowledgeable than I will hopefully post.

Ink may have several functional components:
  • Colorant - Dye or Pigment particles
  • Carrier - Liquid that carries the colorant
  • Binder -Fixes the colorant to the media
  • Additives - promote or create various effects (see here)
The MSDS for a Lucia PGI-72 does not list an "oil" as the carrier. The carrier appears to be water.

https://canon.a.bigcontent.io/v1/static/SDS6404B_EUEN(200930)

Pigment inks use a resin (coating on the pigment particles?) to act as a binder of the pigment particle to the paper. Resins may be Alkyd in nature and derived from a process using oil, no oil, and various amounts of oil.

Typical inkjet printers used in the home use Aqueous- or water-based inks whether they use Dye or Pigment as colorants. Water is the carrier of the colorant. Oil-based inks may be used in printers, including certain inkjets, designed for printing on various media but are usually not standard usage for home printers, for example offset printers and printing on vinyl, glass, textiles.

However, confusing the issue is the following statement from 123ink about "What Is Printer Ink Made Of?"



Several years ago the forum briefly discussed this issue:

https://www.printerknowledge.com/th...r-based-ink-simple-tests-to-distinguist.8159/

FYI - In the ink manufacturing community a "solvent" is something other than water used as the liquid carrier of the dye/pigment colorant, such as an oil or oil-based liquid. Chemically, though, water is considered a solvent. Also, there appears to be inkjet printers that use oil-based inks such as the Epson T7000. However, this is not your typical home printer.
Thank you very much for the technical documentation! The harder removal of lucia pro ink is probably related to the use of more resin materials.
 

Artur5

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They say that an image is worth one thousand words.

I made a test of ink-oil solubility pouring in a narrow glass flask a few ml of cyan pigment ink and olive oil. The mixture was shaken vigorously for a few seconds and put to rest.

At left you see how it looked after one minute. Small globules of cyan ink seem to be floating in oil. In fact they’re going down but due to the high viscosity of the oil, they travel very, very slowly.
At right the mixture after being left to rest overnight. They’re a few particles of ink stuck to the glass walls, but all the ink that was apparently floating in the first picture is now settled at the bottom.

tinta i oli-thum.jpg
 

stratman

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Well done! :thumbsup
 
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