Do pigment inks fade slower than dye inks ?

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Personally I think the main reason why such blanket statements need revisiting and reviewing is because what constituted a "dye" versus a "pigment" has changed enormously in the last 10+ years, particularly in the last 6 or so.

Dye inks are no longer the sole domain of plant/bio' based compounds and pigments are no longer a basic ground paste of minerals diluted in a chemical base. There has been considerable work gone into creating synthetic dyes made up of solvents, co-solvents and materials that earlier chemists probably only dreamed of. Similarly pigments have been refined with encapsulation, ionic charging and more... With that has come the ability to lock down the processes in intellectual property laws so that third parties (including competing OEMs) have had to take the left-overs that don't perform as well.

In laypersons terms though, when you speak of compatible inks it's still very much pigment = less fading, dye = more vibrancy and as has been mentioned you do indeed have to balance budget, need, etc... carefully before committing... but as ever there's no such thing as a free lunch.

Interesting though that we've now reached a point where refilling is far more feasible with OEM inks from the likes of wideformat carts, CIS based OEM printer (Ecotank, etc) and to be able to get the quality, longevity with it... Quite a lot to revisit and rethink I guess...
 

kalides

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i find these threads very interesting. my first inkjets were Novajets, and colorspan drum printers, and the prints did not last very long. i guess the new inks are so far byond those inks it is like alli oop.
 

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I did a short 14 day test to compare the Epson 106 dye inks with a set of pigment inks, these are a mix from earlier tests with an Epson P400, it is a mix of some Epson P800 inks which I got from a member of the druckerchannel forum, I ordered some Canon PFI 105 cartridges which I drained, and there are traces of Aomya Chinese inks.
What do I see after 2 weeks - colors have not changed that much yet that differences in fading are clearly visible, measurements are possible and show the trend:

The pigment ink mix fades slower than the 106 dye inks - the averaged deltaE is 3.03 for pigment inks and 5.90 for the 106 inks, a more detailed look to the colors show which colors fade faster than other colors - it is the cyan dye with a deltaE of 9.82 vs. 5.31 for the pigment ink, it's different for the magenta inks - dye 4.07 to pigment 4.02 magenta - the magenta inks show the same fading speed. Both blacks - pigment and dye - perform very well with a deltaE of 1/dye and 0.42/pigment black, there is no shift to brown at all at this time.

My mix of pigment inks has a benefit in this case over the Epson 106 inks ; as already shown above in the Wilhelm Research test results depend very much on the inkset and their version and the papers used for those tests. This test does not compare a weak 3rd party dye ink like Inktec inks with some pigment inks ( Inktec or other) which will most likely show a much wider improvement with the pigment inks over such weak dye inks.

So does it make sense to switch to pigment inks from dye inks just for the reason to improve the longevity of a print - it depends - it depends on the inks in combination with a particular paper whether this or that ink delivers a better result.

I just remember the HP Premium Plus Photo paper which gives the best longevity - more to dye inks than to pigments as tested longer time ago.
 
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