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What inkjet printers are commercially used?

Discussion in 'Everything Else InkJet Printer Related' started by Laith, May 27, 2019.

  1. May 27, 2019
    Laith

    Laith Printing Apprentice

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    I saw real samples of business cards to be probably at least 400 gsm. However, laser printers go only upto 350 gsm (like some Xerox machines), unless they are from Intec or Xante, whos reliability and print quality I question. The material might not even be paper, and might be (light) board. Also, the print quality of the cards is better than the laser copier we use, Konica Minolta C368. A colleague said it is probably inkjet. Can anyone tell me whether or not inkjets are used professionally for business cards? If yes, which makers and models?
    I do not think they use the wide format inkjets, for example from Epson, like the stylus pro 3880, which can print on 1000 gsm, because the ink cost per 8x10 inch full coverage print is at least $ 0.53, which does not seem so economical, compared to our laser copier which is around $ 0.2. And these inkjets do not last long at all.

    Any information is appreciated. Thanks
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2019
  2. May 28, 2019
    The Hat

    The Hat Printer VIP Moderator

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    Canon were, BUT 3D is better..
    I used the Pro 9500 to print hundreds of business cards 25 up on SRA3 400 gm board for years very successfully, I also had the use of a powered Guillotine for finishing..
     
  3. May 28, 2019
    Laith

    Laith Printing Apprentice

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    Thanks for replying
    Is it common practice to use this category of printers for this purpose? I am asking because the print cost for 8x10 inch prints for the Pro 9500 is $0.82. Of course the ink cost will vary widely for cards because some are not full coverage.
    For what price do you offer the cards? Where do you get the board?
     
  4. May 30, 2019
    Laith

    Laith Printing Apprentice

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    But to compare ink from the previously mentioned printers with a laser like the xerox c9000, $ 0.82 does not seem so way off. I haven't tried their quality to see how they compare.

    Alternatively, I just found out that some presses can go up to 400 gsm, but do not know if it is economical to run it for very short runs, like business cards. These machines probably need to run almost full time without interruption in order to make a profit.
     
  5. May 31, 2019
    PeterBJ

    PeterBJ Printer VIP Platinum Printer Member

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    I think the print cost calculation is not relevant as it is based on photo printing. A photo is printed with nearly 100% ink coverage, a text document maybe 5%. There may be some graphics added to the text in the layout of the business cards, but the ink usage printing these cards will still be much lower than for printing photos.

    The calculation is also based on the use of OEM inks. If you accept to refill using a quality refill ink, ink costs will be further reduced maybe even to 10% of the cost using OEM ink.
     
    The Hat likes this.
  6. Jun 11, 2019
    INKJET ARTIST

    INKJET ARTIST Printing Apprentice

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    ID card.jpg DSCN9270_LL.jpg DSCN9271_LL.jpg DSCN9529_LL.gif
    Take a look at below image. Visit card vs Credit CR 80 card
    This is stacking process. You print your first visit card image on any printer you like. Then you take an HP LaserJet 1200 and print on 200 gr m2 an mash Then you stack photo print + 200 gr m2 + 200 gr m2 and use some laminator to merge this sandwich
    And that is easy 300 400 or 500 gr m2 visit card

    But if you like to print directly to 400 grm3 visit card then you can take that paper cut it in particular visit card. Glue it by double face tape on same piece of paper an d put in an Canon iP 1800. And prin to it. Here is an sample printed directly on Canon iP 1800 at printable CR80 credit card

    Or you can try sublimation transfer on any type of paper weight
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  7. Jun 15, 2019
    Laith

    Laith Printing Apprentice

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    That is some interesting way to print on heavy material.
     

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