1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Picture Of The Week (POW) Information and Submissions
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Official PK Poll: Is there any future in refilling?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. PK Featured Thread: Florida MG7720 Print problem...
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

CISS on A Canon ?, Why Not..

Discussion in 'InkJet Continuous Flow Systems' started by The Hat, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. Apr 16, 2016
    The Hat

    The Hat Printer VIP Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,570
    Likes Received:
    3,218
    Trophy Points:
    363
    Location:
    Wicklow Ireland
    Printer Model:
    Canon Rule in My House
    Here are a few undeniable facts.

    If you look at the Pic below, it’s a simple drawing of a Canon Print Head and Cartridge which clearly shows why a CISS won’t work effectively on a Canon printer.
    No Ciss.jpg click to enlarge.

    The ink nipple on the print head, where the cartridge normally sits, makes firm contact with the recessed sponge inside the cartridge outlet, and that connection and seal is more than adequate to provide a continuous supply of ink to the print head.

    Now add a CISS to that printer and everything changes, because the CISS setup cannot maintain the constant vacuum needed between the cartridge and the rubber gasket and so it has to constantly play catch up while under load.

    The constant vibration created by the CISS tubing breaks the vacuum seal with every stroke back/fourth, but as it prints the reservoir does provide sufficient ink to compensate for this loss, but not while the printer is idle, that’s when the gremlins can begin to creep in.

    Two separate things can now happen slowly or quickly, depending on the installation, the cartridge can ingest air from the broken seal and this can allow the ink to travel back to the reservoir, which then will need re-priming the next day before commencing any print jobs.

    Alternatively with no vacuum and the seal compromised the ink can continuously flow to the cartridge, and out through the broken seal which can slowly flood into the print head till the reservoir bottles empty, it’s no joke because either of the above scenarios can take place in a CISS printer near you.. :eek:
     
    pharmacist and PeterBJ like this.
  2. Apr 16, 2016
    turbguy

    turbguy Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1,290
    Likes Received:
    886
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Printer Model:
    Canon i960, Canon i9900
    You also must consider the pressure pulsations that result from the ink in the CISS tubing during acceleration as the print head reverses direction. There's a reason Epson carts are called "dampers"...

    In my opinion, Canon heads are designed to operate at VERY low pressures, an inch of water head, or even less, with a solid column of fluid (ink) between the inlet screen and the nozzle chambers. If there is any "vacuum" in the column, ink will only flow toward the head due to capillary action, which depends on the fluid's surface tension and other properties.
     
    PeterBJ likes this.

Share This Page