cartridge filling for the professional

Craig Ross

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came across this very informative site on cartridge remanufacturing the indepthnes would make granddad
proud and the microscope photos will make nifty drool

http://users.adelphia.net/~inkprocessusa/

http://users.adelphia.net/~inkprocessusa/techinfo.html

http://users.adelphia.net/~inkprocessusa/cartridgecleaning.html

the link below link may of particular intrest to Hp\lexmark refillers
Grandad a quote from this link

" In Recharger Magazines June 2002 issue, the article titled Inkjet Cartridge Foam - Not Your Everyday Sponge discussed the important role and mechanics of the cartridges foam. The hydrophobic portion of the foam was explained in more detail, discussing how the dry foam above the ink plays a critical role in backpressure and leak prevention. Some cleaning processes, especially those that use centrifuging can damage the foam, allowing the ink to leak and air to go in unwanted places. "


http://users.adelphia.net/~inkprocessusa/articlewhy.html
 

Grandad35

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Craig,

Lots of good information! As the title of this thread indicates, most of the details are directed at professional refillers, specifically of HP carts, but some of it also applies to other cart designs and individual refillers. I have already been reading for 30 minutes, and it will take a while longer to follow all of the links and make sure that I have read everything.
 

Craig Ross

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After studying this web site for a while I thought this guy was a little contradictory
but then realized his philosophy on cart refilling is a simple one. We all go to far
in our attempts to clean heads, rejuvenate sponges etc to the point were damage is actually
done when all thats needed is warm water.
I tested this with some lexmark black pigment ink a particular nasty oily ink
in three crucibles I let the ink dry out, alcohol in one windex in another warm water in the last
and yes the warm water performed best.I then spent the week refilling customers carts using
warm soapy water to clean the heads and priming them on a paper towel soaked in warm water
instead of aggressively vacuum priming and the success rate was high, having said that however
their were some carts that had lost their "ink link" and did require some gentle vacuum priming
but all in all a lot less work
I am however still using alcohol it seems to be the only answer to the recurring viscosity problem on
the canon photo magenta carts, along with microwaving them.
 
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