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3D print bubble bursted, what brands are still floating?

Discussion in '3D Printer Models / Reviews / Experiences' started by Smile, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. Jun 8, 2018
    Smile

    Smile Printer Master

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    Acording to some mass media, the 3D printing bubble bursted some time ago in 2014?
    What brands are still floating and what your general suggestions?

    The amazing is how stupid some prices are, are people really that rich or stupid crazy?
    For example the chinese xyzprinting cheap brand with major problems in their printers braking down and aftermaking their v1 printers they started to make toys with smaller build volumes.

    But the pricing is not declining no matter the demand, or is there no demand then and the prices reflect this.

    3D printer Da Vinci Super - 2699Eur (compare to US 1951Eur with laser module)
    3D printer Da Vinci pro 699Eur (compare to US 678Eur with laser module)

    The bigger the print volume the bigger the scam? If you stack 2 Da Vinci pro you get bigger build volume then then Super version plus double all the electronics at 1398Eur at 1301Eur less or 50% less.

    On the US version

    da Vinci Super + Laser Engraver Module (Free) - 2299USD
    da Vinci Super + Laser Engraver Module (Free) - 799USD

    Given the exchange rate of 100 USD =84.9105EUR this looks crazy

    This is how greed looks like.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
  2. Jun 8, 2018
    Nifty

    Nifty Printer Master Administrator

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    I don't know if the 3D printing bubble itself burst, but I think we've followed the very-common "hype cycle": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hype_cycle

    I'd say we're in the "Slope of Enlightenment" phase.

    As far as brands / prices: I think prices keep coming down while quality (and features/accessibly) keeps going up... at least for the printers most of us have / talk about.

    My first printer: MonoPrice Select Mini is still only $220 shipped (US): https://amzn.to/2M9WeS0

    My current printer, the Creality CR-10, can be found all over for $400 - $500: https://amzn.to/2kTIBdk

    ... and the new Creality Ender 3, which is getting pretty good reviews, can be had for $180 - $250: https://amzn.to/2xTS2Td

    ... or go really big with the CR-10 S5: http://www.creality3d.cn/creality-cr-10-s5-3d-printer-p00099p1.html


    I'd be surprised if the trend towards cheaper and/or more features/quality for the $$ doesn't keep on it's past and current trajectory.
     
    The Hat likes this.
  3. Jun 8, 2018
    The Hat

    The Hat Printer VIP Moderator

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    I must be going deaf, because I didn’t hear the 3D bubble burst, so why would there be an increasingly number of newer models coming to a dwindling market, because I reckon its increasing in popularity, not decreasing.

    As far as prices are concerned, they are in fact very reasonable, compared to an Inkjet printer, but with one huge difference to our inkjet friends.

    We can repair our own printers, upgrade them, build bits on to them, get any amount of spare parts that we want and can do what we like to them without a single restriction, and we also own our 3D printers, now compared that to the inkjet market, this is pure heaven.... :)
     
    FryingSaucer likes this.
  4. Jun 8, 2018
    Smile

    Smile Printer Master

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    I would rather look the assembled and more of a inkjet printer alike stuff like
    Sindoh or https://eu.kodama3d.com/collections/trinus/products/trinus-3d-printer

    It's nice to tinker with stuff but you can't have that and stability. You either adjust, make, built the printer in forever cycle or expect some results from brand name printer.

    It's sad that the 3D printer scene is clustered and stuck like linux with their multiverse of distributions unable to make united force and make revolution true. The greed of every entrepreneur to make more money from those who do not know how much aluminum profiles and stepper motors cost is astounding.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2018
    stratman

    stratman Printer VIP Platinum Printer Member

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    Reminds me of my first optical disk CD writer.

    I do like the laser engraved pancake! :D
     
  6. Jun 8, 2018
    The Hat

    The Hat Printer VIP Moderator

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    @Smile, I do understand where you’re coming from, but if 3D printing is not your forte, then try not to knock it till you have at least experience it first hand, then you’d be more knowledgeable... :hu
    It’s well worth the adventure.. ;)
     
    Smile likes this.
  7. Jun 9, 2018
    Nifty

    Nifty Printer Master Administrator

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    This made me think about where desktop computers were, especially early on. Everyone running different cable connectors, hardware configs, OS, software, etc. Over time there was more and more standardization. Hopefully we'll continue to see this with 3D printers.
     
    The Hat and Smile like this.
  8. Jun 12, 2018
    FryingSaucer

    FryingSaucer Print Addict

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    I've been building my own desktop PCs for about 25 years. OK, I've not been assembling these from individual stepper motors, sensors etc in quite the same way as my 3D printer, but I have selected which components to include in a new PC. Also, I've been continually extending or repairing my PC. For example last week my 2+ year old Western Digital hard drive failed. I already had a SATA 3 connected Solid State Disk for the Windows system disk. I took the opportunity to replace the HDD with a PCIe connected SSD - maybe 20 times faster than the HDD and moved Windows to the faster disk. So for little outlay I've upgraded my PC without replacing it. In fact I've never built a completely new system, always transferred at least some components from the old one. So although standards change and evolve over the years to allow different generations of PC components to interface, my PCs themselves have not really been standardised. I can build what I want with the price and functionality I want. I like it this way.

    There's some parallel in my very cheap home built Anet A8 3D printer. Again I like the fact that I can replace some components very cheaply without buying a new printer. However, upgrading is limited by the mechanical dimensions of the printer. At some point I'll have to get a completely new machine if I want bigger/faster prints. Replacing individual parts forever won't do it.
     
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