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Transferring newer paper thin Canon chips.

Discussion in 'Canon InkJet Printers' started by PeterBJ, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. Dec 1, 2017
    PeterBJ

    PeterBJ Printer VIP Platinum Printer Member

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    In this post @mikling warns that the yellow ink used in CLI-x51 Y/CLIx71 Y cartridges has the same gelling problem as the CLI-42 Y ink if mixed with aftermarket inks or even plain water.

    So if you want to refill one of the CLI-x51 Y/CLIx71 Y cartridges you will need to flush it very carefully with Windex or similar. This is difficult as the cartridges are opaque, so you cannot check the progress of the cleaning.

    Another solution is to use a refillable aftermarket cartridge with an ARC chip, but the chips can come out of sync with the ink content in the cartridge and some of the refillable cartridges suffer from inkflow and leakage problems. If it were not for the yellow problem the use of a resetter and refilling OEM XL cartridges would be the best solution.

    If an OEM yellow chip could be transferred to a refillable cartridge the cartridge could be topped up and the chip resat so so ink content and indicated ink level don't come out of sync. Another and better solution might be transferring the yellow chip to an OEM XL cartridge of another colout that has been carefully flushed.

    Removing the OEM chips without ruining them has been considered almost impossible, see this post by @The Hat . But I stumbled upon an instruction for transfer of these thin chips from a German company. It seems they have sold aftermarket cartridges without chips so the chips needed to be transferred from the used OEM cartridges, just like in the early days of the PGI-5/CLI-8 chips.

    Google translate of the instruction is not very good but the images say most of it. In short you first cut the four nibs that hold the chip in place, then you loosen the glue holding the chip in place by submerging the cartridge in hot water (90-100 C/194-212 F) for approximately 20 seconds. It seems the glue holding the chips is hot melt glue.

    The chip is held in place on the new cartridge by a small piece of double sided sticky tape.

    I will add that it is important that the chip is dry before mounting it on a new cartridge. I have ruined a chip by spilling ink onto it and not making sure it was completely dry after cleaning it and before inserting the cartridge in a printer.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
  2. Dec 2, 2017
    James Michael L. Acierto

    James Michael L. Acierto Getting Fingers Dirty

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    I found that the paper chip seems to come off more easily when you twist it rather than pulling it straight out maybe a combination of the two methods could yield a less risky way of swapping such paper chips ?
     
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  3. Dec 2, 2017
    PeterBJ

    PeterBJ Printer VIP Platinum Printer Member

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    Have you tried "the hot water treatment"? and does it work?
     
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  4. Dec 7, 2017 at 4:12 PM
    James Michael L. Acierto

    James Michael L. Acierto Getting Fingers Dirty

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    Using 2 empty starter cartridges i was able to remove the chips straight using hot water.It does softens the glue really well that it comes off with little amount of force compared to twisting it off or pulling straight off without any treatment.I did not test the chips in the printer but i would guess it should be fine as long as it was properly dried.
     
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  5. Dec 7, 2017 at 4:52 PM
    PeterBJ

    PeterBJ Printer VIP Platinum Printer Member

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    Thank you very much for your testing and report. :thumbsup
     
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