3D Printer Nozzle Quality Comparison

Nifty

Printer VIP
Administrator
Joined
Nov 3, 2004
Messages
2,769
Reaction score
1,089
Points
317
Location
Bay Area CA
Printer Model
CR-10, i560 ,MFC-7440N
I don't do a ton of super-precision, so my gut-reaction is "no, not a huge impact for the casual hobbyist".

What would be interesting is if they printed the exact same test-sample item with the exact same filament, settings, etc., and only swapping those nozzles to see if there really is much difference.

I think the main issues I've heard / seen with various nozzles:
  1. When the "throat" of the upper portion of the nozzle isn't bored perfectly clean and filament can get stuck
  2. When the tip of the nozzle has been eroded away so much (from abrasive filament) that the opening is almost twice as big, so a lot more plastic comes out than is expected, causing issues
... but again, I'm not a purist and do much bigger quick-n-dirty prints.
 

The Hat

Printer VIP
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
6,940
Points
433
Location
Wicklow Ireland
Printer Model
Canon/3D, CR-10, CR-10S, KP3
Do these imperfections matter? If so, at what point do they matter for the printing done by hobbyists?
I have never taught much about the output quality of my nozzles and I use point 5 and as long as it keeps feeding out without clogging then I’m happy, perfection is in the eye of the beholder, and right now this holder is unemployed till I get my printers fixed.. :(
P.S. I change the nozzle head every couple of weeks, I got a bag of 50 spare..
 

Phomemo

Printing Apprentice
Joined
Feb 24, 2021
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Points
13
Printer Model
Phomemo M02/Phomemo PM246 Pro
Brass nozzles are lacking in durability and printing accuracy, especially when printing abrasive materials, the wear is quite high.
However, tungsten nozzles largely make up for the disadvantages of traditional nozzles in this regard, and are more durable and affordable.
 

The Hat

Printer VIP
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
6,940
Points
433
Location
Wicklow Ireland
Printer Model
Canon/3D, CR-10, CR-10S, KP3
Brass nozzles are lacking in durability
Yes brass nozzles are not very durable, that’s correct, but it’s better that they do the wearing out than something else, especially if it buries itself into your glass hot bed..:ep
 

Artur5

Printer Master
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
616
Reaction score
722
Points
238
Printer Model
Canon Maxify 5150,Canon Pro10s
I have never taught much about the output quality of my nozzles and I use point 5 and as long as it keeps feeding out without clogging then I’m happy, perfection is in the eye of the beholder, and right now this holder is unemployed till I get my printers fixed.. :(
P.S. I change the nozzle head every couple of weeks, I got a bag of 50 spare..
Each nozzle lasts only two weeks ?. Way worse than Canon printheads, I’d say. ;)
If I’m not mistaken you use only PLA and not abrasive filaments ? Then, it seems a very short lifespan to this wannabe 3D user, Of course, you print a lot and huge parts too, but even so..

Maybe you might try that model below. I bet it lasts much longer than brass units although I’m not sure if, at 97 euro each, it’s a worthy investment. :D


olsson-ruby.jpg
 

The Hat

Printer VIP
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
6,940
Points
433
Location
Wicklow Ireland
Printer Model
Canon/3D, CR-10, CR-10S, KP3
Each nozzle lasts only two weeks ?.
Wow, hang on a minute, (Just a figure of speack) my brass nozzles lasts as long as they lasts, usually many months, but sometimes I can get a few issues with build up inside and it doesent preform as it should, then I swap it out, no big deal, but my printers are usually going day and night.
P.S. At a cost of 20 cent, and two minutes to change, it’s a no brainer to have them working the way there intended, you can get a lemon with some nozzles O’ by the way I use point 5 nozzles, point 4 and under are for higher quality output..

Then, it seems a very short lifespan to this wannabe 3D user,
P.S. As a furture enterant to the 3D world, you'll come to find that not all brands of filament are 100% quality all of the time, you can get a duff role too..
 

Redbrickman

Printer Master
Joined
Dec 27, 2010
Messages
883
Reaction score
835
Points
253
Location
UK
Printer Model
MB5150
Most machines are set up by default for 0.4mm nozzles. If you change the size it will work just fine but to get the best quality of rprint from another nozzle size you should calibrate the extruder, in fact it always a good idea to do that anyway as the default setting is only approximate.

This article will tell you how to do it for a Creality machine but most machines that run on Marlin can be set up the same way...

https://letsprint3d.net/how-to-calibrate-the-extruder-steps-ender-3-5-cr-10/
 

Artur5

Printer Master
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
616
Reaction score
722
Points
238
Printer Model
Canon Maxify 5150,Canon Pro10s
For best durability, specially with abrasive filaments, I’d thought beforehand that the standard would be tungsten carbide, sometimes pure, sometimes inlaid in cobalt. This is what the industry uses, for instance, in high pressure airless paint equipment. In fact, tungsten carbide is employed only as an insert on the part of the nozzle in contact with the resin or paint; the main body is metal, usually SS.

Nozzles made only of stainless steel are way cheaper but TC nozzles last 10 or 20 times as much and end up being more economical to use.
 

The Hat

Printer VIP
Platinum Printer Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
6,940
Points
433
Location
Wicklow Ireland
Printer Model
Canon/3D, CR-10, CR-10S, KP3
Nozzles made only of stainless steel are way cheaper but TC nozzles last 10 or 20 times as much and end up being more economical to use.
Your over thinking the whole idea of home 3D printing.. Cheap is good, cheapest is bad..
If it works, use it, if it breaks replace it..
 
Top