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oddball CLI8 leak Q

Discussion in 'Canon InkJet Printers' started by jimbo123, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. Nov 6, 2009
    jimbo123

    jimbo123 Print Addict Platinum Printer Member

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    oddball one, been refilling my original 2 year old four CLI8 cartridges using the german method. recently the CLI8 YELLOW has been acting up. when i refill with cartridge upside down ink fills up in the top part of the upside down cartridge above the sponge. then when i flip it over it leaks out. the sponge is heavily saturated, so not sure what is going on. maybe an air passage block.

    not a big deal, i plan to put a new YELLOW in, 2 years of refilling on the orig cartridge is good enough for me.

    just curious if anyone else has seen this

    J

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    Printers: Canon Pixma MP830, IP4500, MP830(new spare in box)
    Method: German Durchstich Method using Canon Cartridges
    Ink: Hobbicolors, great guy to deal with
    Misc: Squeeze bottles, needles, scabbards from Howard Electronics
  2. Nov 6, 2009
    pharmacist

    pharmacist Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    Hi Jimbo123,

    Remove all the ink from the cartridge with the durchstich method and then blow out any ink from the sponge back into the bottle, taking care you close the durchstich refill hole with your finger (or you will risk a horizontal jet of ink splashing over your desk) by putting your mouth over the breathing hole. When the sponge is almost completely dry, refill the cartridge again with the durchstich method, and let the sponge saturate the cartridge passively without forcing. Your problem will now be resolved.
  3. Nov 7, 2009
    jimbo123

    jimbo123 Print Addict Platinum Printer Member

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    quick update. the problem YELLOW cartridge is nearly 2 years old, has been refilled 12 times, so figured it had served me well. also wasn't looking forward to blowing the ink out, making a mess, so was going to give it a proper burial and replace it.

    then decided to give it a shot. i use squeeze bottles, so i thought that was going to complicate things but was pretty easy:

    1. squeezed some air out of the squeeze bottle to create negative pressure
    2. used reverse german method to suck ink out of chamber
    3. was going to blow out the ink out of the sponge, but then decided to try the "reverse german" to the sponge side
    4. took a few "reverse german" steps to suck sufficient ink out of the oversaturated sponge
    5. then filled up ink chamber normally with no backup and leaks
    6. good to go !

    squeeze bottles helped to eliminate the cleanup, not one drop of ink anywhere except back in the ink chamber

    pharmacist, thx for the suggestion

    J

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Printers: Canon Pixma MP830, IP4500, MP830(new spare in box)
    Method: German Durchstich Method using Canon Cartridges
    Ink: Hobbicolors, great guy to deal with
    Misc: Squeeze bottles, needles, scabbards from Howard Electronics
  4. Nov 7, 2009
    Nifty

    Nifty Printer Master Administrator

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    Very interesting! Do you think that reverse German would have been easier, harder, or about the same with a syringe vs. the bottle? I would think you'd get more negative pressure with a syringe, but maybe it wasn't an issue of more PSI vs. volume of air / ink?
  5. Nov 7, 2009
    websnail

    websnail Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    My guess is that with a syringe you only ever get up to 60ml equivalent air volume of potential negative pressure whereas the bottles Jimbo has are considerably larger so you have greater volumes to play with...

    All in all would make sense that you could use a syringe to the same effect easily enough, just the a bottle will return to shape without needing an extra hand, a syringe is a two hander when extracting so a bit harder to manage while keeping the needle in position, balancing cartridge, etc.. All overcome-able but not the easiest.
  6. Nov 7, 2009
    stratman

    stratman Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    Yes, but what a force you can produce with that 60cc's of potential volume. A syringe can generate more negative pressure than a squeeze bottle, at least of the type I use (Howard Electronics).

    A squeeze bottle relies on the elasticity of the plastic of the bottle while the syringe relies on human power to produce the negative pressure. I'd hate to use an equivalent negative force producing squeeze bottle that big or of that elasticity/strength (take a lot of muscle to squeeze) while filling a cartridge.

    IIRC, somewhere on this forum (?) someone fitted some sort of "collar" to the end of a syringe that would then fit onto the ink exit port, the idea being to extract or push in fluids without drilling a hole on the top of the cartridge while using the Durchstich method.

    Definitely an "A" for ingenuity on jimbo123's part!

    BTW... "reverse German" sounds like a gymnastic move. :)

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