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Canon 221 ink in a 226 based printer?

Discussion in 'Canon InkJet Printers' started by ac5a, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. Aug 17, 2011
    ac5a

    ac5a Newbie to Printing

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    Hi, I currently have a CLI- 221 Cartridges. They are refillable and have the auto reset chip. If I go out and buy a 226 based printer will my 221 Cartridges fit? If they do can I swap the 221 auto reset chip with 226 auto reset chips, or do they still work?
  2. Aug 17, 2011
    stratman

    stratman Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    CLI-221 and CLI-226 cartridges are swappable but the chips are not. If you use the CLI-221 in a printer that is designed for the CLI-226 cartridge/chip, then you will need to take the chip off the CLI-226 cartridge and attach it to the CLI-221 cartridge.

    I would recommend a chip resetter for the CLI-226 / PGI-225 chips instead of using autoreset chips. There appears to be a number of these new resetters available via a search on Google. Chip resetters and autoreset chips are specific to model number cartridge chips. Whether there is some physical barrier to using a CLI-226 on a CLI-221 cartridge that has a swapped CLI-226 chip attached is unknown to me, but it would seem that since you can use a CLI-221 cartridge with a CLI-226 chip attached then the CLI-226 autoreset chip chould work as well. As far as I know, no one has said this arrangement does not work. Others will have to guide you on that question. Of course, if you are not using OEM Canon cartridges, then all bets are off on a compatible interface for the autoreset chips as well as functional reliability (ie not leaking or not causing ink starvation and potential print head burn out).

    Lastly, you cannot buy one resetter or autoreset chip set that works on more than one model of CLI/PGI chips. Resetters and chips are matched.
  3. Aug 17, 2011
    ac5a

    ac5a Newbie to Printing

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    So wold I be able to use all my old ink if I got the chips off the OEM ink and reset them with the 226 resetter?
  4. Aug 17, 2011
    stratman

    stratman Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    In general, the ink you use does not matter to the chip, cartridge or printer except in matters of using pigment ink in a cartridge that that is supposed to use dye-based ink (cause clogging). Two additional factors involved in using aftermarket inks -- a low quality aftermarket ink may increase the risk of clogs and/or may not print results pleasant to your eye (colors appear off or unnatural to you).

    So, yes, you may use any dye-based ink (CLI OEM or compatible aftermarket ink) in a CLI-221 or CLI-226 cartridge, barring the exceptions as noted above.
  5. Aug 18, 2011
    ac5a

    ac5a Newbie to Printing

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    But are the 221 and the 226 cartridges the same size?
  6. Aug 18, 2011
    stratman

    stratman Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    It has been reported extensively on this forum that the two cartridges may be used in any printer model that accepts one or the other cartridges. The differences, at least ones of any import, are that the 226 is completely opaque, and therefore more difficult to refill using fill levels, and that 221 chips can not be used or reset by hardware that requires 226 chips (and vice versa).

    I have no personal refilling experience with either chip or cartridge of these 221 and 226 series printers. I do read this forum and believe the preponderance of posts from which I have summarized the information for you in this thread. If there are any differences in the cartridges themselves, it is either of no consequence to those who have used them or few if anyone has pointed it out.
  7. Aug 17, 2012
    twcinnh

    twcinnh Getting Fingers Dirty

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    I just came upon this discussion. Wouldn't the print head influence which chip and cartridge was being used, and how they work together. Or is it just a container of ink that the print head disperses as it sees fit.
  8. Aug 17, 2012
    mikling

    mikling Printer Master Platinum Printer Member

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    The chips are different beteen the 221 and 226. Using a resetter for the 226 cannot convert a 221 to a 226.
    The dimensions are the same. The physical body as well as the ink is the same. So swapping 221 bodies in place of the totally opaque ones of the 225 has been done by many and it is a nice thing to have.
    The printhead itself does not determine the acceptance of the chip. It is the firmware within the logic board of the printer. In fact there are many printers that use the same head depsite using different cartridges i.e. 221 & 226.

    Canon simply wanted to make things more difficult for refillers OR their support people were getting too many questions about the reservoir empty but chip still showing a good portion of ink left. To cut out these support questions, just make the consumer not see the insides. Problem solved. We all know that the sponge holds a significant proportion of the total ink indicated by the chip. Only when the optical sensor sees no more ink in the reservoir, warns about a low ink condition and then the countdown to empty truly begins.

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